Using A Home Care Agency Vs. Hiring Directly

Senior care has changed in recent years from an emphasis on retirement homes and assisted living communities to in-home care. Most people prefer to stay in their own homes when they reach retirement age and retain their independence for as long as possible. Eventually, declining health or medical issues make some sort of in-home assistance necessary. Finding the right person to help out can be difficult. Is it best to hire a caregiver directly, or work with the staff at a home care agency? There are several things to keep in mind when choosing someone to provide in-home assistance for your loved one. Read More …

Average Costs of Home Care

When you realize a loved one needs home care for assistance with daily activities, one of the first things that comes to mind is, “what will this cost?” You may feel guilty putting a price tag on something like that, but it’s a valid concern and something that must be addressed. Healthcare costs are constantly on the rise and without proper budgeting and cost controlling measures, heartbreaking decisions may have to be made in the future. Fortunately, there are many ways to ensure excellent home care for loved ones without a harsh financial burden. Read More …

Benefits of Respite Care

Caring for a family member who needs assistance with daily activities is usually a job gladly taken. At first thought, it doesn’t seem like it would be difficult, because it’s not like having a new baby. After all, an adult can tell you their needs and can be left unsupervised for more than 30 seconds. Over time, caregiving begins to wear people down, both physically and mentally. Extra demands on their time mean they have less time to devote to their daily lives, hobbies, or relaxation. There may not be enough money for vacations, dining out, or fun activities. New prescriptions or medical equipment may lead to budget cuts at home, like cable. As these stresses pile on, caregivers become frustrated and may lose their temper with family and friends. Read More …

Working with Healthcare Providers

When a parent gets older, health issues become more complex or more frequent. Often, it’s hard to keep all the information straight, or keep track of what medications should be taken and when. There’s very little time during a doctor’s appointment to give symptoms, ask questions, and receive a diagnosis, let alone comprehend the diagnosis or ask any new questions. Your loved one may not think to take notes, and questions may come up later after the office has closed for the day. You might not be able to take time off work to accompany them to all the appointments or make arrangements to have someone else go along. Read More …

Home Care Industry Statistics

According to some estimates, by 2060, 24%, or almost 1 out of every 4 Americans will be considered elderly. That’s up from 15% currently. The number is incredibly high due to several factors. The baby boomers who flooded the workforce in the 1970s are now converging on the elder care industry. The first Boomers turned 65 in 2011 and 10,000 more will reach that age every year until the demographic ends in 2029. Improvements in medicine, exercise, and nutrition mean they’re living longer, more active, and better lives and don’t want to spend time sitting quietly in a room. They still want to contribute to society. Read More …

Commonly Asked Questions About Non-medical Care

Ideally, staying at home is the best option as a person ages, but illnesses and other circumstances often make it necessary to have someone else there. Two parents may be fine in the family home together, but when one dies, living alone all the time may be too much for the other. Poor eyesight may limit driving ability, but people still need to get to the grocery store, doctors’ appointments, or social activities. Others may just need a little help around the house with cooking and cleaning. Read More …

Adult Caregiver Guide

When you’re rushing from work to a parent’s home to a school activity, it’s easy to miss subtle signs of change in their mental or physical condition. It’s important to take note of any changes, no matter how small, because one can follow another quickly, or make you remember something. If you notice changes like these, it may be time to speak with your parent’s doctor, because they can be signs that your loved one has a new medical issue. Read More …

Aging-in-Place Guide

Spending as many years as possible living independently in their own homes is the goal of nearly 90% of seniors according to a study by AARP. Their research also shows that 69% of seniors and 75% of their adult children have concerns about the parents’ ability to live independently in the future. “Aging in place”, which refers to living on your own as long as possible, may involve a patchwork of family assistance, community resources, and assistance from a health care agency, but it can be accomplished successfully. Read More …

Fall Prevention Guide

They don’t sound dangerous, but falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among older adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control.  Every year, almost 1/3 of older Americans will fall and injure themselves. Outdoor falls are more common than indoor ones. These people weren’t out being reckless; almost 50% of outdoor falls were related to walking. They don’t have cushy landings. Seventy percent of people involved in outdoor falls land on a hard surface, such as concrete, marble, or wood. As loved ones get older, balance becomes a concern. Physical weakness, visual impairment, medications, or cognitive issues can cause challenges with balance. As they become less steady on their feet, they become more prone to falls on rugs, in bathtubs, and on wet surfaces. Read More …

 

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